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Public Administration

In a one-page handbill please include: Select a specific example of public polic

In a one-page handbill please include:
Select a specific example of public policy from one of the following fields:
Economic policy
An example of economic policy is U.S. budget deficit spending.
Education policy
An example of education policy is the implementation of national education standards.
Environmental policy
An example of environmental policy is the Clean Air Act.
Foreign policy
An example of foreign policy is how we conduct trade with other countries.
Healthcare policy
An example of healthcare policy is the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)
Welfare policy
An example of welfare policy is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).
State a detailed, public policy concern.
State why this issue requires the attention of your fellow citizens.
Support your response with at least two different reasons.
State your detailed, proposed solution.
Solution includes regulation, management, education, taxing, market incentives, or other public policy solutions.
Support your examples with information from the text and at least two, additional academic sources.
Correct grammar and syntax.
APA format.
These are the times that try men’s souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.”
–Thomas Paine
Open your mailbox during a campaign year and you will receive hundreds of unsolicited, political handbills. In addition to a handbill articulating why candidate X deserves yet another term in office, you may receive public policy handbills. These public policy handbills may argue for particular political, social, and/or economic cause. An example of a public policy handbill can be found via Philadelphia’s Office of Supporting Housing. As a supplement to campaign advertising in newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet, handbills play an important role in the political process.
The circulation of handbills has a storied past dating back to the early, revolutionary era. Thomas Paine is remembered as one of the most influential figures of the American Revolution. Was he a general? No. Was he a Founding Father? No. But, it was Paine’s two, incredibly influential pamphlets (for our sake, let us call them handbills), Common Sense and Crisis, that first convinced many colonists to advocate independence and second argued for continued, military recruitment during the early stages of the American Revolutionary War.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Engagement Civic and citizen driven public policy

Categories
Public Administration

In a one-page handbill please include: Select a specific example of public polic

In a one-page handbill please include:
Select a specific example of public policy from one of the following fields:
Economic policy
An example of economic policy is U.S. budget deficit spending.
Education policy
An example of education policy is the implementation of national education standards.
Environmental policy
An example of environmental policy is the Clean Air Act.
Foreign policy
An example of foreign policy is how we conduct trade with other countries.
Healthcare policy
An example of healthcare policy is the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)
Welfare policy
An example of welfare policy is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).
State a detailed, public policy concern.
State why this issue requires the attention of your fellow citizens.
Support your response with at least two different reasons.
State your detailed, proposed solution.
Solution includes regulation, management, education, taxing, market incentives, or other public policy solutions.
Support your examples with information from the text and at least two, additional academic sources.
Correct grammar and syntax.
APA format.
These are the times that try men’s souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.”
–Thomas Paine
Open your mailbox during a campaign year and you will receive hundreds of unsolicited, political handbills. In addition to a handbill articulating why candidate X deserves yet another term in office, you may receive public policy handbills. These public policy handbills may argue for particular political, social, and/or economic cause. An example of a public policy handbill can be found via Philadelphia’s Office of Supporting Housing. As a supplement to campaign advertising in newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet, handbills play an important role in the political process.
The circulation of handbills has a storied past dating back to the early, revolutionary era. Thomas Paine is remembered as one of the most influential figures of the American Revolution. Was he a general? No. Was he a Founding Father? No. But, it was Paine’s two, incredibly influential pamphlets (for our sake, let us call them handbills), Common Sense and Crisis, that first convinced many colonists to advocate independence and second argued for continued, military recruitment during the early stages of the American Revolutionary War.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Engagement Civic and citizen driven public policy

Categories
Public Administration

OVERVIEW Leadership modeling is something we do that determines how we make deci

OVERVIEW
Leadership modeling is something we do that determines how we make decisions when in a
place of authority. This assignment is meant to compare and contrast the models and reflect on
what these models mean to the student in their leadership journey.
INSTRUCTIONS
Choose one or more biblical leaders: Jesus, David, Moses or other biblical leaders and evaluate
their leadership style and approaches and compare to what you have learned so far in this
Module: Week.
What were their specialized approaches and in the case of leaders other than Jesus, what were
their failings as a leader that we can learn from? Also consider limitations we as Christians have
on bringing our faith into our workplace.
This body of the paper should be 14 – 16 pages (3,500 – 4,000 words) in length.
Use the thesis and annotated bib attached
Formatted using APA Style.

Categories
Public Administration

Directions: Using the required, academic readings, and supplemental academic res

Directions: Using the required, academic readings, and supplemental academic research, please address the following while adhering to the Discussion Board Rubric:
Select a specific example of public policy from one of the following fields:
Economic policy
An example of economic policy is U.S. budget deficit spending.
Education policy
An example of education policy are the implementation of charter schools.
Environmental policy
An example of environmental policy is the Clean Air Act.
Foreign policy
An example of foreign policy is the interplay between civil liberties and the Patriot Act.
Healthcare policy
An example of healthcare policy is the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).
Welfare policy
An example of welfare policy is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).
What public policy solution(s) may alleviate the public policy concerning issue?
What could your local, state, the federal government do?
What could individuals or groups do?
Assess the cost-benefits for either taking action or not taking action.
How feasible are your public policy solutions?
How might society react to your public policy solutions?
What are the ethical implications of the public policy solution?
How can one better ‘frame’ the public policy solutions?
Public Policy Analysis: Proposing Solutions
“We women of America tell you that America is not a democracy. Twenty million women are denied the right to vote.”
–Alice Paul
Policy analysis is the study of public policy concern and the development of a solution to the public policy concern. Public policy analysis borrows from rational decision making. According to Michael Kraft, in rational decision making, “one defines a problem, indicates the goals and objectives to be sought, considers a range of alternative solutions, evaluates each of the alternatives to clarify their consequences, and then recommends or chooses the alternative with the greatest potential for solving the problem” (Kraft, 2018). According to Kraft, Public policy analysis contains five steps:
Step 1: Define and analyze the problem.
Who, what, when, where, and why is there a public policy problem?
Step 2: Construct policy alternatives.
What are the possible, public policy options?
Step 3: Choose evaluative criteria.
How do we evaluate the possible, public policy options?
Step 4: Assess the alternatives.
Which alternatives are better?
Step 5: Draw conclusions.
Which public policy option will you choose?
The Centers for Disease Control has an excellent resource on how the institution practices policy analysis.
A key component of public policy analysis is proposing solutions for the public policy concern. Once one identifies the problem then one can offer possible public policy solutions.
Alice Paul’s suffragist activism is an example of proposing solutions for the public policy concern.
The Quaker Alice Paul (influenced by her time with the British suffragettes) was more aggressive than the more demure advocates of women’s suffrage in America. Her group, the Congressional Union and National Woman’s Party, often came into conflict with women who were frightened by the bolder tactics of Paul and her supporters. Paul argued for a constitutional amendment (as opposed to the approach focusing on state action) to guarantee women the right to vote. Paul and her supporters utilized civil disobedience by protesting outside the White House, imploring President Woodrow Wilson to support suffrage for American women. She was arrested and while in jail Alice Paul started a hunger strike, but prison officials forcibly fed her. Even with that, Alice Paul would not back down, and she continued to agitate for what eventually became the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution (Kraditor, 1965).
For more information on Alice Pauls’s impact on political, public policy, please watch PBS’s documentary, “Alice Paul: The Suffragist”.
Reference:
Kraditor, A. (1965). The Ideas of the Woman Suffrage Movement, 1890–1920. New York: W. W. Norton.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Engagement civil and citizen driven and public policy

Categories
Public Administration

Directions: Using the required, academic readings, and supplemental academic res

Directions: Using the required, academic readings, and supplemental academic research, please address the following while adhering to the Discussion Board Rubric:
Select a specific example of public policy from one of the following fields:
Economic policy
An example of economic policy is U.S. budget deficit spending.
Education policy
An example of education policy are the implementation of charter schools.
Environmental policy
An example of environmental policy is the Clean Air Act.
Foreign policy
An example of foreign policy is the interplay between civil liberties and the Patriot Act.
Healthcare policy
An example of healthcare policy is the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).
Welfare policy
An example of welfare policy is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).
What public policy solution(s) may alleviate the public policy concerning issue?
What could your local, state, the federal government do?
What could individuals or groups do?
Assess the cost-benefits for either taking action or not taking action.
How feasible are your public policy solutions?
How might society react to your public policy solutions?
What are the ethical implications of the public policy solution?
How can one better ‘frame’ the public policy solutions?
Public Policy Analysis: Proposing Solutions
“We women of America tell you that America is not a democracy. Twenty million women are denied the right to vote.”
–Alice Paul
Policy analysis is the study of public policy concern and the development of a solution to the public policy concern. Public policy analysis borrows from rational decision making. According to Michael Kraft, in rational decision making, “one defines a problem, indicates the goals and objectives to be sought, considers a range of alternative solutions, evaluates each of the alternatives to clarify their consequences, and then recommends or chooses the alternative with the greatest potential for solving the problem” (Kraft, 2018). According to Kraft, Public policy analysis contains five steps:
Step 1: Define and analyze the problem.
Who, what, when, where, and why is there a public policy problem?
Step 2: Construct policy alternatives.
What are the possible, public policy options?
Step 3: Choose evaluative criteria.
How do we evaluate the possible, public policy options?
Step 4: Assess the alternatives.
Which alternatives are better?
Step 5: Draw conclusions.
Which public policy option will you choose?
The Centers for Disease Control has an excellent resource on how the institution practices policy analysis.
A key component of public policy analysis is proposing solutions for the public policy concern. Once one identifies the problem then one can offer possible public policy solutions.
Alice Paul’s suffragist activism is an example of proposing solutions for the public policy concern.
The Quaker Alice Paul (influenced by her time with the British suffragettes) was more aggressive than the more demure advocates of women’s suffrage in America. Her group, the Congressional Union and National Woman’s Party, often came into conflict with women who were frightened by the bolder tactics of Paul and her supporters. Paul argued for a constitutional amendment (as opposed to the approach focusing on state action) to guarantee women the right to vote. Paul and her supporters utilized civil disobedience by protesting outside the White House, imploring President Woodrow Wilson to support suffrage for American women. She was arrested and while in jail Alice Paul started a hunger strike, but prison officials forcibly fed her. Even with that, Alice Paul would not back down, and she continued to agitate for what eventually became the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution (Kraditor, 1965).
For more information on Alice Pauls’s impact on political, public policy, please watch PBS’s documentary, “Alice Paul: The Suffragist”.
Reference:
Kraditor, A. (1965). The Ideas of the Woman Suffrage Movement, 1890–1920. New York: W. W. Norton.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Engagement civil and citizen driven and public policy

Categories
Public Administration

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment c

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment commenting on these comments from professor. Just simple comment because you are the one who wrote the document so you would know how to answer it shortly, please. Thank you.
1. The Fourth Amendment protects citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures by the government. However, domestic intelligence operations are often conducted without a warrant or probable cause. In addition, domestic intelligence agencies have increasingly relied on sophisticated surveillance technologies, such as cell phone tracking and facial recognition, which can collect vast amounts of data on innocent Americans. As a result, there is a risk that these operations will infringe on our right to privacy.
2. Over the course of this semester, we have discussed the variety of ways domestic intelligence impacts our rights as Americans. In a perfect world, both security and these rights could exist in tandem; in reality, there is a give and take between the two. The concept of third-party doctrine, as established by United States v. Miller (1976) and Smith v. Maryland (1979), combined with the vast amounts of information collected about everyday citizens through our increasing reliance on technology makes it virtually impossible to truly cling to any idea of privacy.
Comments from Customer
PREVIOUS PAPER INSTRUCTIONS (#493353272): Please find attached.

Categories
Public Administration

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment c

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment commenting on these comments from professor. Just simple comment because you are the one who wrote the document so you would know how to answer it shortly, please. Thank you.
1. In some ways the 2011 Japanese Earthquake showed that even with the best laid plans, things still go awry. Japan had a more stable government and emergency management plans as compared to Haiti. However, this was an unexpectedly large earthquake at a 9.0 that then caused a large tsunami to hit the island that then caused a nuclear power plant meltdown. Even though the earthquake and tsunami did plenty of damage, the nuclear power plant ended up being the bigger issue that took much longer to remediate. While the response as far as search and rescue and medical services was well carried out, the response to the nuclear emergency was not. It was initially downplayed when common sense my tell one to go a bit more overboard when dealing with nuclear materials.
2. It was interesting to see some similarities between two vastly different countries, Japan and Haiti, during the course of this week’s reading. While Haiti was poor and largely unprepared, Japan is wealthy and thought it was prepared based on lessons learned from previous disasters. Japan is one of the world’s most disaster-aware countries, with significant resources and a wealth of mitigation activities aimed at diminishing the damage from its most probable hazards. Even so, it demonstrated that even wealthy, technologically advanced and well-organized societies can be overwhelmed by events we call “catastrophes.” (Bissell 2013).
Comments from Customer
PREVIOUS PAPER INSTRUCTIONS (#493355422): Please find attached.

Categories
Public Administration

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment c

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment commenting on these comments from professor. Just simple comment because you are the one who wrote the document so you would know how to answer it shortly, please. Thank you.
1. The Fourth Amendment protects citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures by the government. However, domestic intelligence operations are often conducted without a warrant or probable cause. In addition, domestic intelligence agencies have increasingly relied on sophisticated surveillance technologies, such as cell phone tracking and facial recognition, which can collect vast amounts of data on innocent Americans. As a result, there is a risk that these operations will infringe on our right to privacy.
2. Over the course of this semester, we have discussed the variety of ways domestic intelligence impacts our rights as Americans. In a perfect world, both security and these rights could exist in tandem; in reality, there is a give and take between the two. The concept of third-party doctrine, as established by United States v. Miller (1976) and Smith v. Maryland (1979), combined with the vast amounts of information collected about everyday citizens through our increasing reliance on technology makes it virtually impossible to truly cling to any idea of privacy.
Comments from Customer
PREVIOUS PAPER INSTRUCTIONS (#493353272): Please find attached.

Categories
Public Administration

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment c

OTHER: Please write me two lines for each comment at the end of the assignment commenting on these comments from professor. Just simple comment because you are the one who wrote the document so you would know how to answer it shortly, please. Thank you.
1. In some ways the 2011 Japanese Earthquake showed that even with the best laid plans, things still go awry. Japan had a more stable government and emergency management plans as compared to Haiti. However, this was an unexpectedly large earthquake at a 9.0 that then caused a large tsunami to hit the island that then caused a nuclear power plant meltdown. Even though the earthquake and tsunami did plenty of damage, the nuclear power plant ended up being the bigger issue that took much longer to remediate. While the response as far as search and rescue and medical services was well carried out, the response to the nuclear emergency was not. It was initially downplayed when common sense my tell one to go a bit more overboard when dealing with nuclear materials.
2. It was interesting to see some similarities between two vastly different countries, Japan and Haiti, during the course of this week’s reading. While Haiti was poor and largely unprepared, Japan is wealthy and thought it was prepared based on lessons learned from previous disasters. Japan is one of the world’s most disaster-aware countries, with significant resources and a wealth of mitigation activities aimed at diminishing the damage from its most probable hazards. Even so, it demonstrated that even wealthy, technologically advanced and well-organized societies can be overwhelmed by events we call “catastrophes.” (Bissell 2013).
Comments from Customer
PREVIOUS PAPER INSTRUCTIONS (#493355422): Please find attached.

Categories
Public Administration

Noncharted networks have no official legal status but are permanent well-established organizations (agranoff & radin, 2014).

Below is info for a classmate’s powerpoint presentation. Please provide a discussion response.
Introduction
Part of what makes the United States system so complex is the multifaceted way you can view federalism itself. We see this in the complex models of federalism by Deil Wright and others (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). Below I have outlined the slides that would be utilized and given a presentation about Deil Wrights’ models of intergovernmental relations.
Title Slide – Models of Intergovernmental Relations
Slide 1 – In the first slide of this presentation, I would begin with historical points about intergovernmental relations and their developments over the last hundred years. Specifically, I would list William Anderson’s book Intergovernmental Relations in Review as well as Morton Grodzin’s and the introduction of marble cake federalism as discussed by Agranoff & Radin (2014). The emphasis of this slide would be to help viewers have a better understanding of the historical discussion around intergovernmental relations.
Slide 2 – Next, I would begin to discuss the four waves of IGR, specifically listing the following: law and politics, welfare state development and expansion, agents and partners of governments, and IGR networks (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). Under each of these points will be listed brief facts about each period and how it uniquely impacted IGR. This can be tailored specifically to local governments, as they are a primary deliverer of goods and services; often reflecting local political and economic values (Liberty University, n.d.). For example, under welfare state development, the growth of social welfare programs was significant from the early 1900s through the 1960s (Agranoff & Radin, 2014) yet at the same time, program management and implementation was often left to the states (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). Another example would be the growth of local government in IGR during the New Deal (Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011).
Slide 3 – The third slide would then have Figure 1: Models of national, state, and local relationships as given by Agranoff & Radin (2014). Each model will be discussed, including coordinated authority, overlapping authority, and inclusive authority and their relationship to IGR. Specifically overlapping authority is the most consistent model that aligns with a federal system (Agranoff & Radin, 2014).
Slide 4 – Slide four would list the six chief characteristics that Wright originally focused on as well as several examples that help demonstrate the explanation of how state and local government are utilized within phase four of IGR. Individual examples can be discussed, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which highlights the wide array of state responses and implementation of federal legislation (Agranoff & Radin, 2014).
Slide 5 – Slide five would discuss the expansion of actors through IGR. This would be a good time to reflect on the four phases of IGR discussed in slide 2. Through this, it can be explained how the changing dynamic of IGR has increased the number of actors involved (Agranoff & Radin, 2014; Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011). Importantly, it will be necessary to draw the difference between standard governmental bodies that have been involved in IGR in the past and how IGR now goes well beyond government entities (Agranoff & Radin, 2014; Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011).
Slide 6 – Next it will be important to discuss the practical application of the overlapping model in how decisions are being made. Despite demonstrating that an overlapping model of IGR requires an increase in intergovernmental communication many organizations default to administrating decisions of the federal government (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). An Increase in actors, as discussed in slide 5, has made this even more complex (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). In addition, the functionality of IGR often depends on the view of federal authority and the willingness of local actors to work as subservient or as partners with the federal government (McGuire, 2006).
Slide 7 – Slide 7 would discuss networks in public administration, specifically the difference between chartered and nonchartered networks. Chartered networks are established “by intergovernmental agreement registration” (Agranoff & Radin, 2014, p. 149). Noncharted networks have no official legal status but are permanent well-established organizations (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). These networks have become an invaluable part of IGR and work best when working together toward common solution (Agranoff & Radin, 2014, Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011).
Slide 8 – Performance and IGR would then be discussed. Specifically, performance measures have become popular in IGR as a means to determine program success (Agranoff & Radin, 2014). Federal authority has also inserted itself into performance measures even though they are often multiple ways to achieve a program’s goal (Agranoff & Radin, 2014)
Slide 9 – Slide 9 would discuss the change need to take place in organizations, specifically; managing multiple partnerships and increasing actor networking and engagement. This includes increasing the need for working with nongovernmental actors and their subsequent networks (Agranoff & Radin, 2014).
Slide 10 – The final slide will challenge local leaders to examine their organizations. It will ask them to identify individual actors within their organization and what organization they work with through IGR. Finally, it will ask them to conduct a self-evaluation of their organization and identify what problems they are currently working to solve and how other organizations are being involved in this process.
Slide 11 – Resources
Conclusion
If there is one clear thing, it is that intergovernmental relations require not only the systems and procedures to make IGR successful but the willingness of individuals to work together to accomplish what cannot be done alone (Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011). Ecclesiastes 4: 9-10 says, “Two are better than one because they have a good return for their labor. If either of them falls down, one can help the other up…” (New International Version, 2011). By working together, we have a greater ability to solve problems and use each other’s strengths to help accomplish goals. This means possibly increasing state authority, as it is relatively limited to what has been delegated by the state (Liberty University, n.d.) while increasing collaboration by actors at all levels of government (Agranoff & Radin, 2014; Kincaid & Stenberg, 2011).
Resources
Agranoff, R., & Radin, B. A. (2014). Deil wright’s overlapping model of intergovernmental relations: The basis for contemporary intergovernmental relationships. Publius, 45(1), 139–159. https://doi.org/10.1093/publius/pju036
Kincaid, J., & Stenberg, C. W. (2011). “Big questions” about intergovernmental relations and management: Who will address them? Public Administration Review, 71(2), 196–202. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-6210.2011.02330.x
Liberty University. (n.d.). State and local government intergovernmental relations: Part II [Slide show]. Liberty University Canvas. /courses/405852/files/89175284
McGuire, M. (2006). Intergovernmental management: A view from the bottom. Public Administration Review, 66(5), 677–679. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-6210.2006.00632.x
New International Version. (2011). Biblica (Original work published 1973)